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5/16/2005  

Some Weatherlore

Weatherlore is based on observation of the environment and the effects that changes in the weather have on insects, animals, birds and people. Probably one of the most famous weather lore sayings is from an old English proverb:
Red sky at night, sailors delight
Red sky at morning, sailors take warning

A variation on this theme goes:
Evening red and morning gray,
sends the traveler on his way.
Evening gray, morning red,
brings the rain down on his head.

According to Stalking the Wild: "At dusk, a red sky indicates that dry weather is on the way. This is due to the sun shining through dust particles being pushed ahead of a high pressure system bringing in dry air. A red sky in the morning is due to the sun again shining through dust. In this case however, the dust is being pushed on out by an approaching low pressure system bringing in moisture."


Here are some of my favorite weather sayings!

If the rooster crows on going to bed, you may rise with a watery head.
Clear moon, frost soon.
When the daisy shuts it's eye, soon will rain fall from the sky.
Mackerel skies and mares' tails/Make tall ships carry low sails.
When clouds look like rocks and towers, the earth will be refreshed by showers.

More weather sayings available at Weather world.


Some of my favorite folklore characters have dealt with the weather. Davy Crockett had to unfreeze the dawn; Febold Feboldson was a reknown drought buster; and Pecos Bill took on a tornado!


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