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5/19/2005  

Dog and Cat folktales

It's amazing how many folktales involve dogs and cats. I've rounded up a few of my favorites to share!

The Black Dog of Hanging Hills: Hikers! Beware of a friendly little black dog who may join you on the mountain trail. There is an old saying about the dog: "And if a man shall meet the Black Dog once, it shall be for joy; and if twice, it shall be for sorrow; and the third time, he shall die."

Callin' the Dog: Tall talkin' in Mississippi has been termed "Callin' the dog" ever since that famous tall-tale session when one man offered a hound dog pup to the person who could tell the biggest lie.

Why Dog's Chase Cats: Once long ago, Dog was married to Cat. They were happy together, but every night when Dog came home from work, Cat said she was too sick to make him dinner...

Wait Until Emmet Comes: Some cats visit a preacher who has stopped for the night at a haunted house!

The Talking Mule: The mule is not the only animal that can talk in this story!

The Black Cat's Message: A woodsman on his way home sees a cat funeral taking place. When they see the man, the mourning cats give him a message: "Tell Aunt Kan that Polly Grundy is dead." The woodsman is puzzled and frightened, since he doesn't believe cats can talk and he has never heard of someone named Aunt Kan. (Complete story is retold in Spooky Southwest.)


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